SPACE TOURISM


PERSPECTIVE ALTERING EXPERIENCE 250 MILES ABOVE THE EARTH

Many of those who travel to space recount experiencing a cognitive shift. Being suspended above the planet, they explain, gives the sense that the self and the species are a manifestation of a larger whole. Apollo 14 astronaut Edgar Mitchell called this phenomenon Salva Copa Samadhi, which means, “to see things as you see them with your eyes, but experience them emotionally and viscerally, as with ecstasy and a total sense of unity and oneness.” Experiencing Salva Copa Samadhi, also referred to as the Overview Effect, has been described as a meditative, spiritual, or religious experience. Space travelers return to Earth fundamentally changed, with a renewed perspective on humanity that stays with them for the rest of their lives.

Today, seventeen years after the first astronauts launched from Earth and entered the International Space Station, it gives me great pleasure to invite you to experience space travel for yourself. I had the privilege of directing NASA’s International Space Station program for the last decade, and through that experience saw the social and economic benefits of human spaceflight, and the transformative effect viewing Earth from above has on those who experience it firsthand.

Discover this magnificent voyage on the page below, and come join the pioneers who choose to think big and embrace the life changing thrill and inspiration of spaceflight.

Michael T. Suffredini
CEO and President

Astronaut training in a spacecraft simulator

Credit: NASA

FLIGHTS BEGIN IN 2020

The International Space Station (ISS) has been inhabited continuously for almost seventeen years and is currently scheduled to be retired in 2025. We are building the Axiom Station to increase access to ISS and provide continuity after it is retired. We aim to launch our first two modules to ISS in 2022. When ISS retires, Axiom’s assembled station will separate from ISS.

Axiom flights to ISS will begin in 2020. The missions will expand to our connected modules in 2022, and will then go to the independent Axiom Station starting in 2024.

Axiom missions go to an altitude of 250 miles and provide a continuous 7 to 10 days in microgravity. At this altitude, duration and 51.6 degree inclination our customers will have views of nearly the entire planet not once but twice, insuring views of almost any location that is of interest. This is a truly unique opportunity. The length of time on orbit uniquely permitted by our on-orbit accommodations insures customers are well acclimated to the microgravity environment and truly get to live the experience.

Expedition 14 Commander Michael Lopez-Alegria, and Soyuz Commander and Expedition 14 Flight Engineer Mikhail Tyurin meet with officials moments before heading to the Soyuz launch pad

Credit: NASA

ANTICIPATION: PREPARING FOR YOUR JOURNEY

Space Tourists, also referred to as ‘spaceflight participants’ experience several weeks of preparation for a 7 to 10-day stay in space. For comparison, professional astronauts undergo years of training to prepare for complex missions and piloting of space vehicles.

Axiom Tourists train with professional astronauts. Your preparation will take place in many of the same facilities used by astronauts, and alongside astronauts as they prepare for their missions. The program is designed to give you optimal preparation with the least disruption to your schedule.

PHASE 1: SAFETY TRAINING

Safety training covers how to operate safely to protect yourself, your crewmates and the vehicle. It culminates with an exciting combined exercise of crew members and stand-ins in station mockups. Instructors provide scenarios, emergency equipment including breathing apparatuses and verify your readiness. The training also covers basic life skills in weightlessness, including use of the lavatory and galley.

PHASE 2: USER QUALIFICATION FOR AXIOM AND ISS SYSTEMS

This phase of training prepares you to independently operate basic systems aboard the station. This is beyond training given to tourists in the past, so you’ll have access to a broader variety of activities without an escort. This phase covers the use of communications systems and video equipment to record and share events with folks on Earth, and even to film a movie or commercial. It also covers the use of life support systems. For reference, this phase mirrors the level of training Russian cosmonauts receive to gain access ISS’s U.S. segment.

PHASE 3: CREW TRANSPORTATION VEHICLE (ASCENT AND RE-ENTRY) TRAINING

Vehicle training covers launch and landing procedures, and life in the capsule during the rendezvous period – the time between reaching orbit and docking with the station. There is no operating or piloting training as your host astronauts will fulfill those functions.

SpaceX Falcon 9 Launch

Credit: NASA

THE THRILL OF LAUNCH

Prior to the day of launch, you will enter quarantine only experienced by astronauts and the few people accompanying them, so make sure no unwanted micro-visitors join you in space. In quarantine, you’ll experience astronaut traditions to be discovered on the day of.

You will have completed your studying and preparation, so it’s a day of relaxation and a good night’s sleep. In the morning, you’ll have breakfast and your pre-flight medical check. Then it’s time to brush your teeth and meet the press. Next, you’ll suit up, and the pilot and commander will get their weather brief and systems updates.

The crew transport vehicle will take you from quarantine to the launch pad. You will have been at the pad before, but today it will seem different. In the past, it was quiet and there were many people around. Today it’s just you and a couple of techs. The rocket will be making noises as it’s fueled and venting. It’s a much more alive feeling. The structure is no longer an inert piece of metal. It’s a fully loaded rocket.

You sit in front of the control panel and can’t wait to go. Engines start, you feel and hear them rumble and the hold-down mechanism releases. The acceleration and vibration are impressive. You look in the mirrors as the launch pad and Earth behind you get smaller quickly.

The first stage pushes you past the thick atmosphere and the flight becomes smoother. Acceleration picks up as you leave the atmosphere, you really start to feel the increasing forces and you watch the Mach numbers climb faster and faster from 20 to 22 to 25. Then eight minutes after launch…main engines cut off.

Despite being strapped in, you feel you’re in zero g. It’s peaceful and dramatic.

Cosmonaut Mikhail Tyurin showing his image refracted by a floating water bubble on the International Space Station

Credit: NASA

THE BLISS OF MICROGRAVITY

From your bespoke personal quarters to common areas on the station, our design emphasizes safety, comfort, pleasure and productivity, so you can make the most out of your time in orbit.

Cuisine will be tailored to your individual tastes, along with standard astronaut food items ranging from tacos to cappuccinos (yes, there is a cappuccino machine in space).

Exercise in space is good for the body and mind, just as it is on Earth. You will have access to the station’s exercise equipment. While it is not required for your short-term mission, exercising in space is a unique experience that is sure to keep you feeling invigorated.

European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst photographs an arriving SpaceX Dragon cargo craft

Credit: NASA

ACTIVITIES ABOARD THE STATION

Visitors to orbit have carried out a broad range of missions. Our team will work with you to create yours. Examples include STEM education outreach, microgravity and biological research, film making, photography, music and fitness in space – the options are as broad as your imagination. The environment promotes deep reflection and opens up the creative side of the individual, which can be communicated through art, writing and music. Whatever you choose, you’ll be able to share it with your family and colleagues back home. You will also be able to spend valuable time growing that camaraderie with your fellow crew.

Spacecraft descending back to Earth with crew members from ISS Expedition 41 and 42

Credit: NASA

THE RETURN

It’s bittersweet, your last day on the station. As you get up, the clock starts counting down to undock time. You and your crewmates prepare your vehicle. You don your suit. There are no suit techs in space, so fellow crew members help each other.

You take a final look back into the station and strap into the capsule. The commander closes the hatch and goes through the checklists with you. The undocking is benign and graceful. You snap pictures of station as you draw away from it, and part via radio from your station mates.

Zipping into the atmosphere at 17,500 mph, the friction around the capsule gets so hot a plasma field builds around the capsule. Energy dissipate as the atmosphere slows you down. The pilot works through checklists and procedures. You move your head around to get accustomed to the memory of gravity.

The vehicle slows down further as the pilot chutes, then drone chutes, then main chutes expand, shaken out like a reefed sail. Finally, your capsule is slowed down to a near stop and…

… you’re home.

Astronauts training in a T-38 jet

Credit: NASA

ELEVATE YOUR EXPERIENCE

Want to deepen your experience, train further alongside astronauts, raise your rank among tourists, and do more in space? We will tailor an individualized training program just for you to increase your experience, building you towards the level of a professional astronaut and broadening the activities you’ll be able to carry out in space.

1 HIGH PERFORMANCE JET FLIGHTS

2 ZERO GRAVITY FLIGHT AND KSC LAUNCH SITE TOUR

3 EXTRA-VEHICULAR ACTIVITY (SPACEWALK) TRAINING

4 ROBOTICS TRAINING

5 SUBORBITAL FLIGHT

6 EXTREME ENVIRONMENTS TRAINING

7 KEEPSAKE: YOUR LAUNCH/REENTRY SPACE SUIT


LIFE AFTER SPACE

Travel to space bonds humanity across nations, generations, and cultures. Private space travelers are recognized on the global stage for their contributions to human progress. This is an entirely unique opportunity to represent humanity at its best, and become a greater part of human history. It is an opportunity to more fully realize your life’s potential and to leave a positive mark on the generations that follow.

We like to use the analogy of flower seeds in terms of how people look at people who have been to space. Imagine two handfuls of seeds, one handful that has been to space and one that has not. Plant them side by side. Which will you watch more as it grows? Which will you look to, to learn from? Which will you be more curious about?

When someone returns from space, they are imbued with an aura reflecting their thirst for knowledge, their bravery, and their contribution to the next phase of humanity’s evolution.

Space travelers have gone on to create Mars travel initiatives, receive honorary degrees and doctorates from elite universities, are profiled in major periodicals, depicted in biographical documentaries and portrayed in film. They not only receive awards, but have awards named after them. They have continued to advance their areas of expertise using information they collected while in space.


TRAIN LIKE AN ASTRONAUT AND TRAVEL TO SPACE

Flying to space with Axiom is considerably more affordable than what recent space tourists have paid, yet it is still outside most people’s budget. However, you can act on your dream! Through our partner Space Nation you can compete and win a flight with Axiom to space.
Visit Space Nation at spacenation.org